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Best indoor plants to repel insects

Best indoor plants to repel insects



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Most insect-repelling plants do so with their natural fragrances, which keep annoying mosquitoes away and introduce wonderful scents throughout your garden. If you don't want to douse yourself or your garden in chemical bug sprays you can grow some of these plants to help keep mosquitoes away naturally. Plant these plants in areas where guests will be often such as by a seating area or a doorway. Need more tips to keep your garden pest free? Sign up for our weekly newsletter for timely gardening information!

Content:
  • These Herbs, Flowers, and Plants Will Help Make Your Home an Insect-Free Zone
  • On Best Mosquito Repellent Plants
  • Do Indoor Plants Attract Bugs? (Prevention And Treatment)
  • Mosquito Repellents: Indoor Plants & Natural Remedies
  • Indoor Plants that Repel Bugs
  • 7 Plants That Repel Insects
  • 5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants
  • Beautiful Indoor Plants That Repel Mosquitoes
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: 8 Plants That Repel Mosquitoes and Other Insects Naturally

These Herbs, Flowers, and Plants Will Help Make Your Home an Insect-Free Zone

Ward them off naturally. Every year, the rainy season ushers in springtime, which is a welcome arrival. Rather less unwelcome is what spring—and then, eventually, the heat of summer—inevitably brings. Mosquitos buzz in, emerging from eggs laid in stagnant water across the region. Fun, right? There are a few ways to encourage mosquitos and other biting pests to fly right by, and one such strategy involves the plants nearby. Surround yourself with carefully chosen plantings, and you might just be on your way to warding off the South's pesky populations of mosquitos.

We've compiled a list of plants with fragrant foliage that have been known, either anecdotally or scientifically, to repel mosquitos and other bothersome insects.

Their aromas signal to mosquitos that the environment is not hospitable and that they shouldn't stick around. Some are herbs with multiple uses, making them do-it-all plantings in the garden and the kitchen, too. So get to planting—surround yourself with these plants, and you just might be able to say good-bye to those pesky garden visitors this season.

This easy-to-plant herb has fragrant leaves and thrives in hot and humid climates, making it perfect for Southern landscapes.

Its green leaves are a popular addition to kitchens across the globe. Once planted, basil requires full sun and regular watering. The strong, fresh fragrance of Lemon basil Ocimum x citriodorum has been known to ward off mosquitos in the garden. Catnip, also known as catmint, has aromatic, bright green leaves and small blossoms.

It is a low-maintenance planting that tolerates full sun or partial shade and moderate to regular watering. Nepeta cataria x Citriodora is a good choice for mosquito-repelling, as its fragrant foliage has a citrusy, lemony scent. This plant is a tropical perennial that's widespread in Asia and the coasts of the Pacific. It's also the origin of the known mosquito repellent citronella, the essential oil derived from the plant's tall grassy stalks, that's widely marketed in candles and repellent sprays.

Whether chopping, cooking, or eating, the scent of garlic is a notorious lingerer. It sticks to fingers, utensils, and breath, and it's that quality—the potency of the oily, smelly allicin compound created when cloves of garlic are broken down—that makes it a potential mosquito repellent.

Plant bulbs of garlic, and provide them with full sun and regular water to encourage them to thrive in your garden.

Rumor has it mosquitos don't love the scent of lavender. This showy plant has origins in the Mediterranean region, and it's prized for its downy leaves, purple blooms, and strong, heady fragrance.Not all lavender can thrive when planted outdoors in the South, but with appropriate care—and planting in well-draining, gravel-heavy soil—they have the potential to become perennial garden fixtures.

Lemon balm, the plant also known as sweet balm, has heavily perfumed foliage, which, according to The Southern Living Garden Book, is "used fresh in cold drinks, fruit cups, salads, fish dishes; dried leaves give lemon perfume to sachets, potpourris," with the additional use of potentially warding off mosquitos. It's a tender perennial that thrives in full sun with regular water.

According to The Southern Living Garden Book, "All plant parts are strongly lemon scented and are widely used as an ingredient in Southeast Asian cooking. Growing marigold plants provides showy garden color as well as an easily identifiable fragrance, one that is known to repel mosquitos.

Even some people find it repellent. The Southern Living Garden Book describes marigold foliage as "finely divided, ferny, [and] usually [with] strongly scented leaves. Pennyroyal, a type of mint, gives off a strong fragrance in the form of a classic mint scent. It also possess a powerful flavor; according to The Southern Living Garden Book, the plant is "poisonous if consumed in large quantities but safe as a flavoring.

Another form of mint, peppermint, offers a strong, fresh fragrance from tall columns of deep green aromatic leaves. It can grow to over three feet tall. Peppermint has also been known to repel mosquitos. It is widely known for its flavoring potential, and its fragrance has been adopted for everything from toothpaste to tea.

Aromatic rosemary is a low-maintenance planting, needing just full sun and low to moderate watering in well-draining soil. It's also known for its mosquito-repelling potential. There exist many species of scented geraniums, the foliage of which carries a heavy aroma and is accompanied by showy flowers.Prince of Orange Geranium Pelargonium citrosum and other citrus-scented species, like lime geranium P. Other species also carry strong scents that may help in this garden effort, including peppermint geramium P.

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On Best Mosquito Repellent Plants

What buzzes but doesn't bite, gets right up in your face and loves indoor plants just as much as you do? Fungus gnats. The tiny flying adults are mostly just annoying, but it's the larvae under the soil that do the real damage. Baby larvae feast on fungus, algae and even the roots of your plants. In small numbers they mostly just stick to the organic stuff in potting mix but in large numbers they can do some serious damage to a plants root system. If you remember nothing else from this article, hang onto this tip: "Let the soil dry out between watering! Gnat larvae love warm, wet environments so your overwatered indoor plant is like a little paradise for them.

The best way to control insects and related pests on houseplants is Before buying or bringing a plant indoors, always check it and its.

Do Indoor Plants Attract Bugs? (Prevention And Treatment)

Ward them off naturally. Every year, the rainy season ushers in springtime, which is a welcome arrival. Rather less unwelcome is what spring—and then, eventually, the heat of summer—inevitably brings. Mosquitos buzz in, emerging from eggs laid in stagnant water across the region. Fun, right? There are a few ways to encourage mosquitos and other biting pests to fly right by, and one such strategy involves the plants nearby. Surround yourself with carefully chosen plantings, and you might just be on your way to warding off the South's pesky populations of mosquitos. We've compiled a list of plants with fragrant foliage that have been known, either anecdotally or scientifically, to repel mosquitos and other bothersome insects.Their aromas signal to mosquitos that the environment is not hospitable and that they shouldn't stick around.

Mosquito Repellents: Indoor Plants & Natural Remedies

We know spiders aren't only good for the environment but are necessary. Without them our entire ecosystem will go haywire. But there's two things none of us want indoors, in our houses or anywhere we go, and that's spiders and chemical treatments to keep them away. Fortunately there are a lot of natural spider repellents and some of those include plants that repel spiders indoors and outdoors.

We all could certainly do with less pests in our lives, especially the type that bite, sting, and raid your pantry.

Indoor Plants that Repel Bugs

From the buzz of mosquitos and flies filling the air to ground invasions from cockroaches and ants, fighting back insect attacks can eat up a lot of downtimes, so this is one of those situations where a little prevention goes a long way. Thankfully, there are quite a few houseplants well known for their pest-repelling properties. While pest management services are the best way to keep these creepy critters at bay, this post details some houseplants that can help deter insects and give you some peace of mind. Basil and mint are delicious ingredients, perfect for your favorite Italian fare or a cup of tea. However, they smell terrible to insects. Keep these herbs growing in your sunny kitchen or place a few pots around your doorways.

7 Plants That Repel Insects

Summer is almost here and the arrival of uninvited guests like mosquitoes, moths, and flies begins now! Most of these insects are annoying but some of them are dangerous as well. You never know which mosquito bite is going to get your report positive for Dengue or Malaria or any other serious disease. Well, there are a lot of chemical sprays and coils that people use to get rid of mosquitoes but such chemical sprays infect the air around them.Now, what to do? Mosquito repellent plants are here to help you!

Going Green · Basil · Chrysanthemums · Lavender · Lemongrass · Marigold · Mint · Rosemary · SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER.

5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants

The warmer months are on their way, and what does that mean? If you are not into using chemicals to repel bugs, read on for some great plants that are natural insect repellents! Think about it: repelling insects naturally, and sprucing up your space with beautiful plants- what could be better? Not only is it fragrant and beautiful, but mint has an added benefit: ants and mice absolutely hate it!

Beautiful Indoor Plants That Repel Mosquitoes

There are countless insect repelling plants that look good, smell good and naturally deter bugs and other pests from frequenting your yard. Some of the most common bugs in south Florida include flies, mosquitos and ants. You can tell pests to take a hike by planting the following insect repelling plants. Marigolds are gorgeous and they pack a superpower… the ability to chase away mosquitos without moving a leaf! Your best bet is to stick these beauties near entry points for mosquitos, like the doors and windows of your home or along porch steps. Sweet Basil tastes great when added to dinner and its strong scent is a natural deterrent for flies and mosquitos.

There are few things more unpleasant than being curled up in bed with a good book, your pup on your feet, about to sink into sleep It is the worst.

With warmer weather here and our love of entertaining outdoors, our open houses are an invitation for mosquitoes and other pesky bugs to congregate around us and our cooking areas. Basil: This essential summer culinary herb also repels both flies and mosquitoes. Catnip: Oil from catnip has been found to be more than ten times as effective at repelling mosquitoes as DEET. Lavender: A hardy perennial that can handle the hot sun and dry soil so is the perfect addition to your summer garden.Marigolds: These brightly coloured summer annuals repel mosquitoes which is why they make such a good companion plant in the vegetable garden — particularly planted with basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, potatoes, squash and tomatoes. Pennyroyal: Often found growing in lawns, this strong-scented mint deters both flies and mosquitoes.

If you tend to spend long summer evenings hanging out on the patio or in the backyard, keeping bugs and mosquitoes at bay is probably a top priority. For pest control that will actually make your outdoor space look better, consider adding a few plants that repel mosquitoes. Whether you introduce pots of fragrant lavender around the perimeter of your patio or start planting citronella grass in your garden, these multi-tasking plants are both pretty and serve a purpose. For the best effect, be sure to position the plants as close as possible to the sitting area.